Samadi Challenge: Men's Health Month Screening Guidelines

June is Men's Health Month. Across the country many organizations are celebrating and spreading awareness with screenings, health fairs and other health education. We'd like to call women to take the Samadi Challenge and help the men in their life get healthy. Women are the perfect advocates for men's health. When it comes to many issues that effect men like erectile dysfunction and prostate cancer, women can be the champions and voice for opening up the conversation about symptoms, early diagnosis, treatment and even prevention. 

When it comes to prostate cancer specifically, many men are not educated on their risk factors for this disease. Popularity for cervical cancer and breast cancer screenings and awareness has increased recently (mammograms and pap smears), we hope to achieve the same awareness for prostate cancer and the PSA blood test for screening. The #SamadiChallenge is a pathway to encourage men to shift focus on their health. 

Helping men live longer healthier lives is my passion. Through the years I have realized that if you want to get something done, ask a woman to do it. It was with that frame of thought that I created Women for Prostate Health. Prostate cancer affects 1-in-7 men throughout their lifetime and is treatable if caught early. By educating women on the importance of having the men in their lives get tested, taking preventative measures such as with their diet and being open to discussing treatment options if necessary, I believe we can really make an impact on men’s health.
— Dr. David B. Samadi

Samadi Challenge: Men's Health Matters

The Samadi Challenge asks women to: 

1. Learn the prostate cancer risk factors.

2. Improve the lifestyles of the men in their lives.

3. Encourage men to get Screened annually.

4. In case of a positive diagnosis, urge men to seek Treatment immediately.

Women are the perfect advocates to educate men about the importance of prevention and screening. They're generally extra precautionary when it comes to routine check-ups and pay close attention to their risk factors. Women are better advocates and care more about important issues related to health than men. They take their health more seriously. We need that kind of thinking to rub off on men.

Statistics show that women make over 70% of the medical decisions in a household. Women are proactive and anticipate health issues and practice prevention. Research also shows that they ask a lot of questions of their doctor and want to make an informed decision regarding their health.

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Screening Guide for Women on Men's Health

For men in their 20s: 
-Complete physical every three years 
-Get blood pressure checked every year 
-Cancer screenings every three years particularly for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin 
-Cholesterol test for total, LDL and HDL (the good kind) every three years 
-Testicular self exam every month

For men in their 30s 
-Complete physical every 2 years 
-Get blood pressure checked every year 
-Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years 
-Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years 
-Testicular self exam every month

For men in their 40s 
-Get blood pressure checked every year 
-Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years 
-Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years 
-Testicular self exam every month 
-Complete physical every 2 years 
-Baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal exam (DRE) 
-Stool test (for colon and rectal cancers) every year

For men in their 50s 
-Get blood pressure checked every year 
-Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years 
-Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years 
-Testicular self exam every month 
-A sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy (for colon cancers) every three to four years or as recommended by your healthcare provider 
-PSA and DRE exam every year

What Women Need to know about Men's health

Men live an average of 5 years less than women. More men suffer and die from chronic illnesses than women. They’re 1.3 times more likely to have cancer than women and 2 times more likely to die from liver disease. The evidence is clear and the risk is high; men need to be more attentive to their health. In prostate cancer alone, there are 233,000 new cases in the U.S. every year and 1 out of 7 men are diagnosed. Due to these hard facts, getting an annual PSA screening is essential.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force screening standards claim men should start getting their PSA (prostate specific antigen) screenings at age 55. The number of younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer has increased 6 times in the last 20 years and the disease is more likely to be aggressive.

Dr. Samadi believes it to be wise for men to begin screening for their PSA between the ages of 40-45. If you have a family history or are african american, you’re more at risk for prostate cancer. It’s important to get a PSA screening at age 40 to learn what your baseline is. Then have a conversation with your doctor about where you’re at and how to watch it over time.

According to the American Urological Association, a PSA screening can find prostate cancer early, before it has spread. Early treatment can help some men avoid problems from cancer later on and live longer.

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Accept the #SamadiChallenge

To accept the challenge, women must get a man in their life to have a routine PSA screening and get testosterone levels checked, record a video message challenging three other women to do the same and post it on the Women for Prostate Health Facebook page.

Getting men to care about their health is a real issue and we know that women are vigilant when it comes to screening. We need them to motivate the men in their lives to have that same proactive attitude towards their health.

“My husband of 27 years was diagnosed with prostate cancer and is now cancer free thanks to Dr. Samadi. I want to challenge my female friends to get all of the men in their lives tested. It’s the numbers that save lives. Symptoms do not have to be present for cancer to be present. The PSA is an early indicator of prostate cancer,” says Lisa Hill who took the #SamadiChallenge in 2014.